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How To Get Inside Your Prospect´s Head With Sales Copy?

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How To Get Inside Your Prospect´s Head With Sales Copy?

Postby jsawvel » Thu Jan 15, 2009 9:29 pm

I have been doing some reading about "in person" sales and I have read that a sales letter is supposed to be "selling in print."

How do you figure out what motivates your potential buyers?

In one on one selling this would be done by asking them questions at the beginning in person, like, "What did you like most about your previous television?"

These questions are supposed to allow you to figure out what benefits are important to your buyer.

How do you do this when writing copy, since you don´t have just one person to taylor your pitch to, but hundreds of different individuals?

Where do you get feedback about a particular product or service and find out what is important to people?
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Postby karriflatla » Sat Jan 17, 2009 12:13 am

You may not be able to get a reader's feedback re a particular product or service but what you can do is research their demographic and psychographic profile. What is your market's worldview? How do they think and feel about the TYPE of product/service you're offering? i.e. are they skeptical, eager, big thinkers, play-it-safe types, etc etc.

You can research these things online in forums, by reading articles/books/magazines, observing popular culture, and even conducting surveys with systems like Survey Monkey.

So while you may not be able to speak with your reader directly you can engage your target market at large to understand what motivates it.

HTH!
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Postby Bensettle » Sat Jan 17, 2009 11:00 am

That's a very good question, actually, here's a neat little "guide" I like to use:

http://www.makepeacetotalpackage.com/clayton-makepeace/8-ways-to-spot-dominant-emotions-your-prospects-already-have.html

Ben
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Postby karriflatla » Sat Jan 17, 2009 2:46 pm

Ben - thanks for pointing us to this article. It spurred me to write this post today over at Search Engine Guide:
Twitter as Target Market Research Tool (and the Twitterization of Clayton Makepeace)

(Mods: checking with you first before I post link to the article. No probs if not!)
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Thanks Ben, I´m A Big Fan...

Postby jsawvel » Sat Jan 17, 2009 7:37 pm

Hi Ben! I have listened to several of your interviews and also enjoy stopping by your blog.

You will soon be a legend in your own time. (assuming you aren´t one already.)

I´m not sure if this is an accurate depiction. But I see there being a new type of individual emerging in the information age. This person is completely mobile, can live anywhere in the world and leverage technology to reach a new level of freedom never before possible.

I am also a big fan of Tim Ferris and there are probably more people with the desire for independence or the desire to build their own future/life/destiny etc.

Anyway, I see copywriting, selling and product creation as the ideal way to gain independence and be able to generate value basically independently.

There aren´t many jobs left like that left.

I am not a pro yet, but I am commited to getting there, because the rewards are just too great.

Thanks for the excellent link. I think thats a cool idea to try to imagine that you are your prospect and think of how you can solve some of their frustrations, aches and pains etc. (although don´t let your imagination go too far. I wouldn´t want to find myself in the body of a 19 year old girl, trying to decide which braw will enhance my bustline the most effectively. That´s just scary.)
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Reading more from the link...

Postby jsawvel » Sat Jan 17, 2009 7:54 pm

Now I am starting to understand how "empathy" fits into the selling process.

If you really know what its like to be in your prospects shoes, then what the person is facing should be more real to you and you should want to solve their problems.

So, a salesman should be a GOD granting good things to people, because he understands what keeps them awake at night and what means the most to them.

In this light, selling seems like the most noble profession of all, if your product can deliver.
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Postby Bensettle » Sun Jan 18, 2009 1:55 am

In this light, selling seems like the most noble profession of all, if your product can deliver.


I think it is, too.

In fact, one of my favorite copywriting teachers (Ken McCarthy) once put it like this:

"He who cares most [in business], wins."

Ben
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Postby JosephRatliff » Fri Jan 23, 2009 3:15 pm

Bensettle wrote:
In this light, selling seems like the most noble profession of all, if your product can deliver.


I think it is, too.

In fact, one of my favorite copywriting teachers (Ken McCarthy) once put it like this:

"He who cares most [in business], wins."

Ben


Word up Ben!

Robert Collier's "Letter" book would be good for this too...isn't that the one that talks about "entering the conversation in the reader's mind" ?

I guess I could just stop being lazy and get my copy off the shelf.. 8)
Last edited by JosephRatliff on Tue Jan 27, 2009 6:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Bensettle » Fri Jan 23, 2009 7:50 pm

Holy cow I've been a terrible moderator here :(

I totally missed these:

Ben - thanks for pointing us to this article. It spurred me to write this post today over at Search Engine Guide:
Twitter as Target Market Research Tool (and the Twitterization of Clayton Makepeace)

(Mods: checking with you first before I post link to the article. No probs if not!)


Absolutely, go ahead an link away as long as it's relevant to the discussion.

Hi Ben! I have listened to several of your interviews and also enjoy stopping by your blog. You will soon be a legend in your own time. (assuming you aren´t one already.)


Thank you for the compliment :D

I don't think I'm a legend -- unless you count some my really obnoxious blog posts and emails people have a hard time forgetting...

I guess I could just stop being lazy and get my copy off the shelf..


'bout time you got off your arse and got to work Joseph -- you're making even guys like me look disciplined :D

Ben
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Postby JosephRatliff » Fri Jan 23, 2009 8:32 pm

'bout time you got off your arse and got to work Joseph -- you're making even guys like me look disciplined Very Happy

Ben


Truth is...I still haven't moved...I decided to take the day and visit the forums I haven't in awhile (business is BOOMING)...

And...

LOL, you're way funny, so... ROFL.... :lol:

Ahhh forget it.
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Postby procopywriter » Sun Jan 25, 2009 8:04 pm

I second the nod to Ben.

Ben, I've been reading your blog for some time now. Great work! You were one of the key inspirations for upgrading my static site to a WordPress platform recently so I can blog on a daily basis.

Now... To add a contribution to the excellent replies to jsawvel's question...

Selling in print is LIKE selling in person, but it's not the same thing. Selling in print is far less effective at closing the deal for the very reason you pointed out.

As you mentioned, when you sell in person you have the opportunity to get feedback from the prospect and find out first-hand what motivates him and what benefits he cares about, etc.

That's why sales professionals can get 25-50% or more closing ratios. Those kind of closing ratios in print are virtually unheard of.

Most marketers measure response in terms of 1-2% if they've done a really good job of targeting the right offer to the right market in the right way.

The best you can hope for is to gauge what the MAJORITY of your customers find important... to deal with the MAJOR objections... etc.

Think of it as averaging out to the least common denominator. That's why your sales letter should be as focused as possible toward the tightest possible niche or target market.

That way, you have certain known variables you can work with.

All that said...

Once you've selected a target you're going after, speaking with them one-on-one is one of the best ways to "get inside their head" and find out what's important to them.

Just as you alluded to in your original post, you can craft a more focused sales message if you've actually had a chance to speak to and get to know members of your target audience.
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Postby jsawvel » Tue Jan 27, 2009 9:54 pm

Just as you alluded to in your original post, you can craft a more focused sales message if you've actually had a chance to speak to and get to know members of your target audience.


Yeh, I have read (listened to) a couple books on selling now. And the "in-person" selling process seems to be about getting feedback from your customers.

The cool thing about gaining "in-person" selling experience is you get instant feedback and it is probably a faster learning curve than copywriting.

With copywriting, you have to do a lot of work to craft a message and you might not get it right and you may not know what went wrong. So, you have to spend a lot of time recrafting your message etc, until you start to figure out what works or you get good at selling.

Part of the attraction of Online Business can be the idea of anonymity or not really having to interface with individuals. There is a sense that you have the freedom to be above it all.

However, it seems like to be really successful, you have to develop a relationship with your customers and communicate with them. And usually you are going to want as long a term relationship as possible, so that you don´t need to keep on aquiring new customers, or you have to work less hard at it.

It may be more difficult to MAKE THIS HAPPEN online. You have to present yourself in such a way that people feel comfortable talking with you, they trust you, they think you are there to help and they feel like you are talking their language.

It would be nice to create some sort of "feedback mechanism" that does this work for you. Im sure you can if you get enough customers to work with.

I liked your point about directing your sales message to the "least common denominator."

Since you can´t taylor your sales pitch to individuals, you have to try average it out and target a narrow group of people with things in common.

For me, this is a real challenge.

It seems like it might be easier to pick 1 or 2 markets and get to know them and just sell products in those markets.

For me, it seems like learning the market is the hardest part of selling.
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Postby Bensettle » Sat Feb 21, 2009 12:59 am

For me, it seems like learning the market is the hardest part of selling.


It may be the hardest, but it is by FAR the most important part.

If you know your market better than anyone else, there is no way you can lose -- even if your sales copy is weak or lame.

Ben
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