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Who Homeschools?

Time management, organization, working from home while raising children... Join us here to discuss the issues of daily life - and work - under the same roof!

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one of mine...

Postby LynnWilson » Fri Feb 18, 2005 6:19 am

I am currently homeschooling only one of mine, though I have homeschooled some or all of my four for the last nearly 7 years! I think it is wonderful. I can relate to Lynn, though, with the pressures from outside. I help care for my dad, who is disabled, and I have always had to work as well. My husband was supportive, but I just felt I wasn't doing enough of the three R's.

I have one child with dyslexia who just would NOT thrive in a public school setting. He is my one homeschooler right now. The others are all happy and adjusted in public schools right now. I do miss having them ALL here. But maybe one day. We take it one year at a time!

You can visit my website for more of our experience, articles, etc., regarding homeschooling!

Lynn :D
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Postby Jason Moffatt » Fri Feb 18, 2005 11:29 pm

When I have kids I would love to home school, although I have some reservations about it. Sure, it would be great, I could teach my kids everything I know. The problem is I don't know everything, and there are some things I will never have the desire or time to learn. I sincerely believe that a child who learns from many people will benefit much more than those who are subjected to the same teachers for a long period of time. I'm not trying to undermine anyone's ability to properly teach their kids, but I have a hard time believing that any of us could provide everything our kids need in a education. There is so much to learn from so many people in the world that I would never want my childs growth limited to only what I taught him or her.

Also if anyone decides to home school it is of the utmost importance that they are involved in social activities, such as sports, dance, drama, etc. etc. I hope this is stating the obvious here.
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Postby LynnWilson » Thu Feb 24, 2005 8:27 pm

Well, I think all human beings crave interaction, but it does not necessarily have to be with the same-age peers for it to be healthy. Also, sports and drama are not necessary to growing up to be a literate, productive member of society. So, in my humble opinion, it is not speaking the obvious!

I respect your opinion, and there is a lot to learn from many people. However, it does not have to start in the elementary years. Actually, from what I have seen and read, children who are grounded at home first and allowed to develop their own true interests in life, without the influence of peer pressure, are much more likely to pursue those interests unheeded!

I can truly speak from both sides. Three of mine are currently in public school. My child who is exclusively homeschooled is by far the most original!

Lynn :D
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Postby Jason Moffatt » Sun Feb 27, 2005 10:49 pm

I very much agree with you concerning young kids. I admit I would be very hesitant to send my children off into the world of public school before the age of 8 or 9.
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Postby Lynn Terry » Mon Feb 28, 2005 9:07 am

I agree. Homeschoolers have access to 4H, Scouts, and many other organizations. When I homeschooled we had a lot of friends, had big weekend sleepovers, traveled a lot, etc. We certainly never lacked for "interaction".

Jason Moffatt wrote:I admit I would be very hesitant to send my children off into the world of public school before the age of 8 or 9.


Oh boy. That's when the worst of it just begins :lol:

Seriously, my children are 8 & 13 now - and it's tough. I worry about weapons and drugs. Not so much that my children will pick them up, but that they will be affected by others that do. I worry about bad teachers (in case you havent seen the news, one here in my county is currently being charged with 15 counts of sexual battery by an authority figure and 13 counts of statutory rape). I worry about fights, about them learning things the hard way (that they have no business learning at this age), etc.

That's being a mother, I guess. The children are both very happy and well adjusted in public school. I miss homeschooling terribly. We did that specifically because my son was very sick for a couple of years. Being a single mother, and without the support of family, it got tough in the end. To put it bluntly - my daughter was told that she would have to work at Burger King for the rest of her life because she was homeschooled. :|

I made the transition back, very reluctantly, to avoid any serious issues. Both of my children aced the re-entry tests and maintained honor roll grades.

Point proven. Heart broken. I think in the end now I would advise any parent to follow their heart, or go with their gut. YOU know best.
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Postby 3bgeneral » Mon Feb 28, 2005 8:08 pm

Jason wrote:
The problem is I don't know everything

That's o.k. neither do the teachers.

I'm not trying to undermine anyone's ability to properly teach their kids, but I have a hard time believing that any of us could provide everything our kids need in a education.
The school system can not provide everything either. The parent does know the child better than anyone. The nice thing is you can focus on your childs strengths. You go at your childs pace not at a pace set by a school.

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Postby LynnWilson » Mon Feb 28, 2005 8:34 pm

Lynn, I agree with everything you said about missing it terribly!! I miss having all mine here! My two youngest are in a small, small school and are doing great, so I am reluctant to make a change with all that is on MY plate right now.

Jason, again, your point is well taken. We were involved in many group activities. We put on a Medieval Feast (as a large homeschool co-op) and the children had a blast!! Jousting, plays, science, the whole 9 yards! However, just recently my 14 year old spent a week in the country with his grandparents. He fished, went rabbit hunting, learned to make his own fishing lures, etc. He learned things from them that I cannot teach him!!

Bev, well said! No one knows it all!

Homeschooling is work and a huge commitment, but I think for every moment of time a parent invests in their children, they get back a hundredfold in results in every way!

Lynn
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Postby Guest » Tue Aug 16, 2005 1:55 pm

We are starting unschooling this year and I am looking forward to it. My son is 11 and starting 6th grade. Up until now he has been in public school. It has been a hard road because though his teachers try (for the most part) no one really understands how he learns and what his motivations is. He was diagnosed mild adhd when he was 5 and i choose not to medicate, teachers didn't like that but oh well...lol Anyway, i am worried about him falling through the cracks in middle and high school so now that I am able to stay home, we are trying it this year. I hope he enjoys it as much as i think he will! I have many homeschooling/unschooling friends so i am not worried about his socialization. If any of you started homeschooling later in your kids life, how did you make the transistion?

Peace,
Christy
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Postby Lynn Terry » Tue Aug 16, 2005 4:16 pm

Hi Christy & Welcome :)

My children were starting K & 4th grade when I began homeschooling. My son had become ill during his 3rd grade year, which made it difficult on both him and the public school system. To top it off, he was labeled "gifted" and shifted back and forth through various upper grades (with much older kids).

While my daughter had not yet started school, she was accustomed to a very structured pre-school environment - and of course my son had 4 full years in the system.

I was expecting it to be a BIG adjustment on them both... but to my surprise, they fell right into the routine without much problem. It turns out it was a BIG adjustment on ME :lol: . I learned just how "pliable" children truly are... much less resistant to change, and very easily influenced.

We homeschooled for 2 years while my son recovered. After that, they were both anxious to return to school... and while it was a tough decision on me (again, BIG adjustment LOL) - they have done really well with that transition, too.

Best of luck to you!
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Postby Guest » Tue Aug 23, 2005 9:13 pm

Hi Lynn,

Thank you so much for the encouraging words. I know kids are pretty flexible for the most part so that will help. I think I am the one that needs a longer adjustment period...lol Like you said, it is harder on me than him. We just "started" unschooling this week and so far so good. We haven't really done a lot but just the fact that we are getting along and he is taking more responsibility for things is a huge accomplishment! We have some field trips planned with some other local homeschoolers so i think that will help get us going in the right direction :) Again, thanks for the input, sometimes a little reminder is all we need huh?

Peace,
Christy
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Postby Lynn Terry » Tue Aug 23, 2005 9:25 pm

Definitely!

Glad to hear things are starting off on the right foot. Just remember: you are in complete control, and your options are endless. If you get discouraged (I know I did at times!) you can always make changes. You can take breaks when you need them, and push hard when you need to. Just take it one day at a time ;)


By the way, I really like Henry David Thoreau - read up on him awhile back after reading some awesome quotes around the 'net... interesting story!
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Postby WAHumor » Thu Aug 25, 2005 9:21 am

I like HDT too!

"Walden" is one of my all-time favorites and much of his writing chronicles his travels throughout Massachusetts, including Mount Greylock.
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Postby Guest » Thu Sep 08, 2005 10:22 am

Thank you for your encouragement. I know sometimes it will be hard but I know we will get through it. We have a great support system of other unschooling families I know and i am on some great local yahoo lists as well. We are still deschooling somewhat but he is feeling the effects of boredom. The other day i was sewing (something i rarely do) and he wanted to learn how to sew, even made a secruity blanket for his little brother. Then he helped with dinner. Showed me a bit of what i have to look forward to as days/months pass. I also checked out "The Teenage Lieration Handbook" from the library for him (and me) to read. I am hoping that will help him realize how it all works...

Again thanks for the kind words and well wishes :)

Peace & Wellness,
Christy
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Postby Ladan Lashkari » Sat Sep 10, 2005 6:02 am

Hi,

I live in Iran and we don't have homeschooling over here. I just read this thread and I'm curious what exactly homeschooling is. Does it mean children study school lessons at home?

Thanks! :)
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Postby Lynn Terry » Sat Sep 10, 2005 12:10 pm

Yes, basically. Instead of attending public school they can be associated with a particular organization or group (very loose structure)... or you can simply register as a home schooler with the board of education and do things your own way. There are many different types - eclectic homeschooling, unschooling, and even very structured homeschooling methods with umbrella schools or churches.

People choose to do this for a variety of reasons. I homeschooled for 2 years when my son was sick... I had a very hard time keeping him in public school as they just werent equipped to handle the situation, so it was the best solution for everyone.
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