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Who Homeschools?

Time management, organization, working from home while raising children... Join us here to discuss the issues of daily life - and work - under the same roof!

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Who Homeschools?

Postby ggagolfer » Sun Nov 21, 2004 4:37 pm

Just wondering how many of us are juggling our children's education and our vocation at the same time.
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Postby americanwahm » Sun Nov 21, 2004 5:12 pm

Me :) My 14 year old has been homeschooling since the 6th grade. It's a good fit for us and we plan to finish it out this way.
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Postby Lynn Terry » Sun Nov 21, 2004 6:27 pm

I miss it terribly!

I homeschooled both kids for a couple of years while my son was recovering. He was diagnosed with severe anxiety & depression, and had grand-mal seizures, the year he was in 3rd grade. Sad that it was the situation that prompted homeschooling, but it ended up being just the best couple of years for us. Being a single mother, I got a lot of pressure from the outside, and my son recovered very well... so they went back to public school recently. We're all very happy, but like I said - I miss it terribly!
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Postby shelwriter » Tue Nov 23, 2004 1:41 pm

I've been wanting to homeschool really badly. (oohh, that was bad grammar - ignore me, I'm living off of Nyquil right now) I asked one of my son's the other day if he thought he'd like to be homeschooled.

He scoffed, "You'd just get on my nerves mom!"

:lol:

So, we've put it on the backburner for now... *sigh* Because he's probably right.

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Postby Pac-n-Seal.com » Thu Nov 25, 2004 11:33 pm

We had our 2 boys in a good private school, but it only went up to 3rd grade.

When the older one graduated from there he and my wife decided to go the home school route.

The younger one stayed in the school for another year and then went the homeschool route.

So far so good - the older boy is now in 8th grade and his brother is working on an advanced level.

It is quite interesting trying to run a business and educate the kids, but i think they are also getting a good education in Capitalism as well!
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Postby Josiah » Wed Dec 01, 2004 10:46 pm

I'm a homeschool graduate, and feel really privileged to have that education. It enabled me to do things I otherwise couldn't have done.
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Postby PattyGale » Thu Dec 02, 2004 9:42 am

My daughter will be 4 in a couple of weeks. She's already starting to read small words and can write her alphabet and her name (with no help from me!)

I've been thinking about homeschooling, but still not sure. I have some time to think about it.

I have a good friend who homeschooled 2 of her daughters... one graduated early from high school because she did so well and the other is doing really well.

Everything I hear about homeschooled kids is all good....regarding their academic achievements, etc. I guess my question is about the interaction with other kids and not keeping them isoloated.

Hope that doesn't sound silly, but I'd like to explore this option more to see if it's a good fit for us.


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Postby 3bgeneral » Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:46 am

Although I am not homeschooling this year I have homeschooled my daughter for the past 3 years. I give alot of credit to people who homeschool. Especially while trying to work.
I guess my question is about the interaction with other kids and not keeping them isoloated.
I think homeschooled kids interact with people of all ages and not just there peers of the same age. There are alot of groups and homeschool support. There is so much to do that I don't think you have to worry about them not interacting.
I agree with Josiah that homeschooling gives you opportunities you might not of otherwise had.

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Postby Lynn Terry » Thu Dec 02, 2004 3:21 pm

PattyGale wrote:I guess my question is about the interaction with other kids and not keeping them isoloated.


Between friends, family & neighbors... this never became an issue for us. And you can still join 4H & scouts, and there is always the community centers and skating rink and local park... :D

Of course, if you are involved with local groups, that helps as well. There are generally homeschooling or parenting groups that meet in most locations.
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Postby PattyGale » Thu Dec 02, 2004 8:51 pm

Thanks for the responses! This is definitely something I'm going to do more research on.

Emily and I visited our local "Y" the other day and there were homeschool gym classes going on while we were there. I thought that was so cool!

My one big stumbling block will be my mother-in-law. I know, Emily is my daughter. My MIL is a retired Milwaukee public school teacher, and has already stated her very strong feelings about homeschooling. I love my MIL dearly, but the last thing I need to hear for the next 15 years is about homeschooling vs. traditional school.
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Postby Lynn Terry » Thu Dec 02, 2004 9:45 pm

As I mentioned in my post above, I got "pressure from the outside" as well. This ended up as a huge damper, as the 'outsider' got to the kids without ever expressing their feelings to me. A rotten move, but it worked... and the children were both convinced they should move back into the public school system.

2 against 1 in a house of 3 :shock: :cry:

Luckily everything is going well now, and we're all happy with the current circumstances. It doesnt have to be a permanent decision, so that is something to keep in mind... However, maybe she will warm up to the idea over time ;)
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My grandkids are home schooled

Postby Warren Contreras » Thu Dec 02, 2004 10:45 pm

Three of my grandkids are home schooled and doing very well. We have seen obvious improvement that is very gratifying and their mom thinks it is well worth all the work.

I also have a son that teaches Spanish and shows reptiles to home school kids so interaction is often available if you seek it out. There are many ways parents of home schoolers can get together to inexpensivly bring in outside talent in a group situation.

I think it's great.
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Postby Rasby » Fri Dec 03, 2004 4:36 pm

Hey all,

This thread is of particular interest to me, not because I have school aged children but because I am dealing with the results of various types of schooling. I teach college and, believe me, I can tell within the first week which students have been home schooled or have attended private schools versus those who are graduating from our public schools (at least in our area of North Carolina).

As a product of the public school system myself, I was all in favor of public schools until I started seeing the results of our current public school system. In theory, I am still very much in support of providing public education to all children because we need an educated populace. Unfortunately, many of our public schools are failing to educate children because they are spending so much time trying to control behavior and drug problems. I do believe that we need to support public education. But, in all honesty, the children I am seeing that are home schooled are much better prepared to do college work than most (not all, of course) students that are coming out of our public school systems.

I asked my freshmen class the other day what they considered the biggest problem within our public school systems and what strategies they would suggest to remedy the problems. Two problems were mentioned by almost every student: they were afraid of being injured because of the amount of violence, and they were nervous about the number of students who were doing drugs during school hours. They believe that the schools are spending so much time trying to teach to tests and control violence and drugs that students aren't really learning much.

Anyway, for what it's worth, homeschooling may not work for everyone, but it is certainly a viable option for those who can do it. I personally applaud those who are doing it since it requires a tremendous amount of time and effort. I'm sorry I got carried away with this, but I hate seeing how many of our young people are so ill prepared for college. Rasby
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Postby PattyGale » Fri Dec 03, 2004 5:13 pm

Thanks Rasby,

I appreciate your comments especially considering the postion you are in. I have two sons who are both in college...one is a junior, the other a freshman. They both attended the same small, private Catholic all boys high school with very high expectations of the students. My oldest attends a public university playing baseball, and said that his freshman year of college was nothing more than a review of his senior year in high school.

My freshman is at Xavier University, a small private university, and is having an interesting year adjusting to dorm life and college, and seems to be doing very well. He is also in ROTC, which adds to his schedule.

I truly believe in all my heart that their private school education helped them prepare for college and the decisions they have to make, not just academically, but socially as well.

Their high school cost more than my college education 20 years ago, and their dad and I were certainly in no position to just write a check for that amount of money. The school understood that, not just from us, but others as well, and offered all kinds of work-study programs during the summer and the school year.

So, both my boys did that... 6 weeks of work study in the summer was credited toward one semester of tuition... and during the year, the same was offered after school hours.

And the school doesn't turn anybody down, either. There was one family who couldn't afford the textbooks, much less tuition. The school let the mom work in the cafeteria in exchange for some credit for her sons' tuition and her son did work-study, too. He graduated with my oldest and was awarded a full football scholarship to Holy Cross in the northeast.

The comradarie among the parents and teachers was like something I've never seen before. You would see just about every single teacher at every sports event.

The sports teams? The kids were responsible for taking care of the fields... not hired grounds-keepers. And for such a small school, they have no problem competing athletically with public schools much larger in size and usually go to play-offs and state rounds almost every year.

When my oldest graduated in 2002, his graduating class made school history by having the highest accumulated GPA and the most scholarship money ever awarded to one graduating class.

99% of all the boys go on to some type of additional education or military academy such as West Point or Anapolis.

It's a small school in terms of students... averaging about 500 - 550 in grades 9-12. Teachers are always accessible to the kids and parents.

O.K., I'm bragging, I know and I apologize for the ramble, but my whole point is that there is such an incredible element of academic and personal responsibility taught at this school. Even more than that, there is a cooperative effort among the teachers, parents and the boys, something that has pretty much disappeared from public education.

So, for my daughter, who is 3, if I decide not to go the homeschooling route, she will be attending a small, Christian school as well.
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Postby Rasby » Fri Dec 03, 2004 11:25 pm

Dear Patty Gale,

Your experience illustrates what I am seeing. The kids I see coming into my freshman classes fall into a bipolar pattern in terms of skills and grades. Rather than grades falling along a bell curve like we would expect, there are very good students (tends to be those who have gone to private schools or who have been home schooled) and those who can barely read and write beyond a sixth grade level. And your son's experience is correct: we spend the freshman year just trying to get them up to speed so the freshman year is often nothing more than review of high school material for bright students. Very frustrating to say the least.

I'm very happy for you that your children are getting an education that still stresses hard work, personal responsibility, and academic excellence. Many of my students are under the mistaken impression that the best course of action is to try and avoid as much work as possible. I tell them that a diploma may get them in the door, but it won't keep them from being fired if they can't do the work. I truly applaud you and your husband. I know it is a huge sacrifice to send children to private schools, not only financially but also in terms of transportation, etc.

I don't want to sound like all students are terrible. I actually have some very good students. It's just that there are way too few of them. Have a great day. Rasby
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